The 5 Best Command Line Music Players for Linux

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The terminal is usually used to accomplish administrative tasks on a Linux system such as installing packages, configuring services, updating, and upgrading packages to mention a few.

But did you also know you can enjoy playing your favourite audio files straight from the terminal? Yes, you can, thanks to some cool and innovative console-based music players.

In this guide, we shine the spotlight on the best command-line music players for Linux.

1. CMUS – Console Music Player

Written in C programming language, CMUS is a light-weight yet powerful console-based music player designed for Unix/Linux systems. It supports a wide range of audio formats and is quite easy to navigate once you have mastered some basic commands.

Let’s take a look at some of the main features in brief:

  • Support for an array of popular music formats including mp3, aac, wave, and flac to mention a few.
  • Output sound in ALSA and JACK format.
  • Ability to organize your music in playlists and create queues for your songs. With CMUS, you can also create your custom music library.
  • Plenty of keyboard shortcuts that you can use to make your user experience fun.
  • Support for gapless playback that lets you play music without interruption.
  • You can find extensions and other handy scripts from CMUS’s wiki.
CMUS Console Music Player

Install CMUS on Linux

$ sudo apt-get install cmus   [On Debian, Ubuntu & Miny]
$ sudo dnf install cmus       [On CentOS, RHEL & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S cmus         [On Arch Linux & Manjaro]

2. MOC – Music On Console

Short for Music On Console, MOC is a light and easy-to-use command-line music player. MOC allows you to select a directory and play audio files contained in the directory beginning with the first on the list.

Let’s take a look at some of the key features:

  • Support for gapless playback.
  • Support for audio files such as wav, mp3, mp4, flac, oog, aac and MIDI.
  • User defined-keys or keyboard shortcuts.
  • ALSA, JACK & OSS audio output.
  • A collection of customizable colour themes.
Moc - Music On Console
Moc – Music On Console

Install MOC on Linux

$ sudo apt-get install moc    [On Debian, Ubuntu & Miny]
$ sudo dnf install moc        [On CentOS, RHEL & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S moc          [On Arch Linux & Manjaro]

3. Musikcube

Musikcube is another free and opensource terminal-based music player that leverages a collection of plugins written in C++ to provide functionality such as data streaming, digital signal processing, output handling and so much more.

Musikcube is a cross-platform music player that can even run on Raspberry Pi. It uses the SQLite database for storing playlist and track metadata. It runs purely on a text-based UI built with ncurses.

Let’s take a look at some of the key features:

  • Can deliver an output of 24bit/192k audio with ease.
  • The music player offers both playlists and play queue management.
  • Can act as a streaming audio client on a headless server.
  • Support for libraries with over 100,000 tracks.
  • It provides gapless playback with cross-fading effect along with index tagging.
Musikcube - Terminal Based Music Player
Musikcube – Terminal Based Music Player

For installation, head over to the releases page and grab the .deb or .rpm for your version of Linux and install it using the installation guide to get up and running.

4. mpg123 – Audio Player and Decoder

The mpg123 player is a free and opensource fast console-based audio player and decoder written in C language. It is tailored for both Windows & Unix/Linux systems.

Let’s take a look at some of the key features:

  • Gapless playback of mp3 audio files.
  • Built-in terminal shortcuts.
  • Supports many platforms ( Windows, Linux, BSD and macOS ).
  • Multiple Audio options.
  • Support a vast variety of audio output including ALSA, JACK and OSS.
Mpg123 - Audio Player and Decoder
Mpg123 – Audio Player and Decoder

Install mpg123 on Linux

$ sudo apt-get install mpg123    [On Debian, Ubuntu & Miny]
$ sudo dnf install mpg123        [On CentOS, RHEL & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S mpg123          [On Arch Linux & Manjaro]

5. Mp3blaster – Audio Player for Console

Mp3blaster has been around since 1997. Sadly it hasn’t been in active development since 2017. Nevertheless, it’s still a decent terminal-based audio player that lets you enjoy your audio tracks. You can find the official repo hosted on GitHub.

Let’s take a look at some of the key features:

  • Support for shortcut keys which makes it relatively easy to use.
  • Commendable playlist support.
  • Great sound quality.
Mp3blaster - Audio Player for Linux Console
Mp3blaster – Audio Player for Linux Console

Install Mp3blaster on Linux

$ sudo apt-get install mp3blaster    [On Debian, Ubuntu & Miny]
$ sudo dnf install mp3blaster        [On CentOS, RHEL & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S mp3blaster          [On Arch Linux & Manjaro]

That was a round-up of some of the most popular command-line players available for Linux, and even for Windows. Is there any you feel we have left out? Give us a shout.

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